October 18, 2017  

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Articles in "Education and Psychology"

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The application deadline is near for the Saturday Gifted Studies Program, conducted by the Frances A. Karnes Center for Gifted Studies at the University of Southern Mississippi. Students who have not submitted an application by Saturday, Dec. 10 will not be able to participate in the program.

In today’s world, there is a constant need for qualified teachers in our public schools. That is why The University of Southern Mississippi offers qualified teacher assistants currently working in the classroom a way to become certified teachers, all while staying in their community and working at their current jobs.

 

“Teacher assistants provide a great service to the K-6 community,” said Dr. Kelley Stricklin, Teacher Assistant Program (TAP) coordinator. “They play a key role in helping educate students by supplementing what the teacher is doing and helping build upon the quality of lessons and activities.”

Copies of Kate DiCamillo’s book “Tale of Despereaux” were recently given to children attending fourth grade in the Hattiesburg Public School District (HPSD), courtesy of the Fay B. Kaigler Children’s Book Festival. DiCamillo is recipient of the Festival’s Southern Miss Medallion, which will mark its 50th year when it is held on the Hattiesburg campus April 5-7. On hand for delivery of the books include, from left, Rowan Elementary School Principal Donna Scott; USM student Janila Simmons; Dr. Catharine Bomhold, associate professor in the USM School of Library and Information Science; Dr. Robert Williams, HPSD superintendent; Karen Rowell, admissions and events coordinator for the USM School of Library and Information Science; and HPSD Assistant Superintendent Dr. Teresa Poole. DiCamillo is scheduled to give a special presentation during the festival to these students in Bennett Auditorium on the Hattiesburg campus.

The Fay B. Kaigler Children’s Book Festival is presented by the USM School of Library and Information Science. For more information, visit https://www.usm.edu/childrens-book-festival.

The University of Southern Mississippi’s physical education program was honored at the Mississippi Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (MAHPERD) 2016 Convention in Jackson, Miss. Nov. 3-4.

A University of Southern Mississippi faculty member recently acted as a liaison with a national organization aiding youth in her native Baton Rouge who lost vital educational resources in the August floods that devastated southeastern Louisiana.

Teachers from Mississippi’s prestigious School of the Arts and from other schools across the state will be guests of the Frances Karnes Center for Gifted Studies Tuesday, Oct. 25 on The University of Southern Mississippi Hattiesburg campus. The teachers will be participants in a seminar presented by Dr. Suzanne McKee-Waddell, titled “Embracing Digital Writing for the Gifted Classroom.”

Select faculty at The University of Southern Mississippi are currently participating in a national development initiative designed to dramatically expand the use of evidence-based teaching practices shown to promote college student completion and success.

Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) is widely regarded as one of the safest and most effective methods for treating children with autism. ABA methods allow children to achieve basic skills such as reading and conversing at an earlier age, and in some cases, more involved educational skills. 

Dr. Suzanne McKee-Waddell’s long history of working with exceptional students makes her the clear-cut choice to serve as interim director of the Frances A. Karnes Center for Gifted Studies at The University of Southern Mississippi.

The Mississippi Department of Education (MDE) and The University of Southern Mississippi have received a $5.25 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs to implement professional development and coaching on Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) and Universal Design for Learning (UDL) in order to improve educational outcomes for all students, including students with disabilities, in Mississippi.

Dr. Claire Kimberly, assistant professor in The University of Southern Mississippi’s Department of Child and Family Studies, recently offered effective stress management strategies related to work, finances and family relationships in an article for Wallet Hub titled “2016’s Most & Least Stressed Cities in America.” The article can be viewed at https://wallethub.com/edu/most-least-stressed-cities/22759/#claire-kimberly.
 

A journal submission by a University of Southern Mississippi faculty member and graduate student in its College of Education and Psychology has earned special recognition.

“The Forgotten Slayings: Memory, History and Institutional Response to the Jackson State University Shootings of 1970,” published in Volume 43 of the American Educational History Journal (AEHJ) and co-authored by Melandie McGee, a doctoral student in higher education administration, and Dr. R. Eric Platt, assistant professor in the Department of Educational Studies and Administration, earned the publication’s “Article of the Year” honor.

Dr. James E. Whorton, a former chairman and professor in The University of Southern Mississippi Department of Special Education (now Department of Curriculum, Instruction and Special Education), died July 17 in Tyler, Texas. He was 73.

Services will be held at 11:30 a.m. Saturday, July 16, at Hardy Street Baptist Church for longtime University of Southern Mississippi professor Dr. Harold V. Knight, 84, who died July 13 at his home in Hattiesburg. A private family burial will follow in Highland Cemetery.

As the number of students taking online courses continues to grow, The University of Southern Mississippi has initiated steps to meet their academic needs with the establishment of a new Office of Online Learning.

Funding awarded by National Geographic to a University of Southern Mississippi graduate student will support a unique research project focused on the communication capabilities of North American river otters.

A University of Southern Mississippi graduate program accredited for more than three decades has received an extension of that status for its continued success at meeting a variety of quality benchmarks.

The book bin may be tiny, but the impact could be huge for students at The University of Southern Mississippi’s DuBard School for Language Disorders who soon will have access to a renowned Little Free Library.

Identifying solutions to some of Mississippi’s most pressing problems was the focus of the “Advancing Mississippi: Research for a Better Mississippi for More Mississippians” Conference held last week in Jackson.

 

The Frances Karnes Center for Gifted Studies at The University of Southern Mississippi is hosting a variety of programs for academically talented and gifted youth this summer on the Hattiesburg campus, attracting students from across the state and nation. Established in 1979, the Center furthers the education of gifted students and those with leadership abilities through teaching, research and services.

More than 2,000 education professionals are expected to convene at the Mississippi Gulf Coast Coliseum and Convention Center in Biloxi June 8-10 for the 2016 Making Connections Conference.

Dr. Gordon Cannon, Vice President for Research at The University of Southern Mississippi, has announced the awarding of nine Proposal Development Grants for 2016.

University Research Center (URC) is hosting its first “Advancing Mississippi: Research for a Better Mississippi for More Mississippians” Conference on Thursday, June 9th in Jackson. Researchers from across the state will present papers that address the systemic challenges that Mississippi faces.

As part of an ongoing commitment to student success, The University of Southern Mississippi has realigned key service programs under one broad umbrella to create a comprehensive retention initiative for students from the time they enroll until graduation.

 

The changes include moving the Student Support Services Program (SSSP) under the Office of New Student and Retention Programs (NSRP), which was established last August to increase retention and graduation rates for new and continuing students. The popular Think Center – designed to help students build solution-oriented thinking skills – has also moved under NSRP.